Iran opens the gate to a long and stony road

In a new column, international affairs analyst Jonathan Manthorpe writes of the remarkable developments today between Iran and the United States, at the United Nations in New York. But hopes for a thaw in the icy relationship are tempered by tough questions

Science speaks on climate change

By CHRIS WOOD  The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a summary of its fifth periodic report on what’s happening to our planet’s climate on Friday, Sept. 27. The balance of the report, collecting the findings of more than 2,000 researchers over

Facts and Opinions goes LIVE.

OPEN HOUSE: September 25 – October 1  It’s official folks, we are live. Welcome to our Open House – come in and browse our sections for no charge, before our paywall goes up on Oct. 1.  Independent, non-partisan and employee-owned, Facts and

New column: Aggression roils the East China Sea

Today’s column by international affairs analyst Jonathan Manthorpe examines why the relationship between China and Japan is souring, as Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe loosens constitutional restrictions on the use of the country’s armed forces. Japan’s move is in response to increasing military pressure from China over

Shattering Canada’s solitudes

By Deborah Jones Opponents of Quebec’s controversial proposed “charter of values” are their own worst enemies. You’d think a workplace ban on kippas, turbans, burkas, hijabs and large crosses worn by public employees would unite religious minorities and other political activists. Instead, opponents

Taiwan’s leadership, China’s influence – and leadership intrigue

Eight years ago international affairs analyst Jonathan Manthorpe authored Forbidden Nation: A History of Taiwan, published by Palgrave-Macmillan of New York. Manthorpe returns to the subject in today’s column, explaining why political upheaval looms in Taiwan as President Ma seeks to retain his party’s

Oz follows Canada on the fossil-fuel road

Chris Wood’s new Natural Security column suggests we might as well say goodbye to a bunch of Pacific Islands, along with the Majuro Declaration – scrapped by Australia’s new leader, a man in the mould of Canada’s Stephen Harper.  The column, in Commentary, can be

Little Stephen in the Land of Oz

CHRIS WOOD: NATURAL SECURITY Published September 12, 2013 The Majuro Declaration. Ever heard of it? I thought not. The two-page document was released Sept. 5 by a group of 15 small Pacific island nations, and two somewhat larger Pacific island nations —

The Others of 9/11

A Black Hole is defined, in lay terms, as a piece of space with a gravitational field so fierce that no matter can escape. Since airborne terrorists attacked New York, Virginia and Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001, the world has been pulled toward a metaphoric Black Hole, one created by

What the wedge between Saudi Arabia and the United States means

I learn something new with every piece by international affairs analyst Jonathan Manthorpe. In today’s column Manthorpe looks at the growing rift between Riyadh and Washington, as a symptom of both major change in the national stance of Middle Eastern countries, and a