Tag Archives: Spotlight

‘Spotlight’ wins top Oscar amid night of race-related critiques

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By Jill Serjeant
February 28, 2016

Host Chris Rock opens the show at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Host Chris Rock opens the show at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Catholic Church abuse movie “Spotlight” was named best picture, the top award at Sunday’s Oscar ceremony, after an evening peppered with pointed punchlines from host Chris Rock about the #OscarsSoWhite controversy that has dominated the industry.

Mexico’s Alejandro Inarritu nabbed the best directing Oscar for “The Revenant”, taking home the trophy for the second straight year after winning in 2015 for “Birdman.”

“The Revenant” had gone into Sunday’s ceremony with a leading 12 nominations, and was among four movies believed to have the best chances for best picture after it won Golden Globe and BAFTA trophies.

“I (am) very lucky to be here tonight but unfortunately many others haven’t had the same luck,” Inarritu said, expressing the hope that, in the future, skin colour would become as irrelevant as the length of one’s hair.

Alejandro G. Inarritu, nominated for Best Director for his film "The Revenant", arrives with his wife Maria Eladia Hagerman at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Alejandro G. Inarritu, nominated for Best Director for his film “The Revenant”, arrives with his wife Maria Eladia Hagerman at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Leonardo DiCaprio got a standing ovation after finally winning his first Oscar for his leading role as a fur trapper left for dead in “The Revenant” and spoke out on climate change in his acceptance speech.

Alicia Vikander, nominated for Best Supporting Actress in "Danish Girl," wears a yellow Louis Vuitton gown as she arrives at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Alicia Vikander, nominated for Best Supporting Actress in “Danish Girl,” wears a yellow Louis Vuitton gown as she arrives at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Rising star Brie Larson, 26, took home the statuette for best actress for her role as an abducted young woman in indie movie “Room” to add to her armful of trophies from other award shows.

Racial themes and barbs about the selection of an all-white acting nominee line-up for a second year ran throughout the evening as black comedian Rock opened the show that he called “the white People’s Choice awards.”

Among the surprises, Britain’s Mark Rylance beat presumed favourite and “Creed” actor Sylvester Stallone to win the Academy Award for best supporting actor for “Bridge of Spies.”

Swedish actress Alicia Vikander won the supporting actress Oscar for transgender movie “The Danish Girl” while documentary “Amy,” about the late and troubled British pop star Amy Winehouse was also a winner.

Open Road Films’ <RGC.N> “Spotlight”, which traces the journalism probe of sex abuse in the Boston Catholic Church also won best original screenplay.

Warner Bros <TWX.N> “Mad Max: Fury Road” started the night with 10 nominations and the action-adventure won a slew of Oscars, including for costume, make-up, editing, and production design.

Copyright Reuters 2016

(Additional reporting by Nichola Groom, Lisa Richwine and Piya Sinha-Roy:; Editing by Mary Milliken)

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Host Chris Rock opens the show at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Host Chris Rock opens the show at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

FACTBOX: Key winners at the 88th Academy Awards

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – The 88th Academy Awards, the highest honours in the movie industry, were handed out a ceremony in Hollywood on Sunday hosted by comedian Chris Rock.

Following is a list of winners in key categories for the awards, also known as the Oscars.

BEST PICTURE

“Spotlight”

BEST DIRECTOR

Alejandro Iñárritu, “The Revenant”

BEST ACTOR

Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant”

BEST ACTRESS

Brie Larson, “Room”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Mark Rylance, “Bridge of Spies”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Alicia Vikander, “The Danish Girl”

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

“Spotlight”

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

“The Big Short”

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

“Inside Out”

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

“Amy”

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

“Son of Saul” Hungary

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

“The Hateful Eight” Ennio Morricone

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“Writing’s On The Wall” from “Spectre”

Copyright Reuters 2016

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; Editing by Mary Milliken and Sandra Maler)

Joe Biden addresses sexual assault

By Piya Sinha-Roy

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden introduces singer Lady Gaga after making a plea to prevent sexual abuse at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden introduces singer Lady Gaga after making a plea to prevent sexual abuse at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Vice President Joe Biden made a special appearance at the Oscars ceremony on Sunday to advocate for victims of sexual assault and introduced a powerful performance by Lady Gaga that featured survivors of sexual abuse.

Biden came on stage to rousing applause, quipping “I’m the least qualified man here tonight” before he addressed the issue of sexual assault.

“Despite significant progress over the last few years, too many women and men on and off college campuses are victims of sexual abuse,” Biden said.

He then asked the audience to join him, President Barack Obama and survivors of abuse in taking the pledge to “intervene in situations when consent has not or cannot be given.”

“We must and we can change the culture so that no abused woman or man – like the survivors you see here tonight – ever feel like they have to ask themselves, ‘What did I do?’ They did not do anything wrong.”

Biden then introduced Lady Gaga as “my friend and a courageous lady herself.”

Gaga, dressed in white and playing a white grand piano, performed her Oscar-nominated song “Til It Happens to You,” from the documentary “The Hunting Ground,” which investigated widespread sexual assault on American college campuses.

In a red carpet interview televised on ABC prior to the show, Gaga identified herself as “a survivor” and expressed her appreciation for the opportunity to perform the song and spread awareness. “I’m very grateful to the Academy for giving us this world stage to reward survivors for being brave and coming forward,” she said.

Dozens of victims of sexual abuse appeared on stage holding hands behind Gaga and received a standing ovation.

“Til It Happens to You” lost out to the latest James Bond theme song “Writing’s On The Wall” performed by Britain’s Sam Smith, who acknowledged Gaga in his acceptance speech, calling her “incredible.”

Gaga returned to the Oscars stage a year after she led the Academy’s tribute to the “Sound of Music,” singing a medley of classic songs from the musical film.

Gaga’s Oscar performance comes on the heels of a busy month for the singer, who earned praise for her rendition of the national anthem at the Super Bowl.

The six-time Grammy winner, known for pop songs such as “Bad Romance” and “Born This Way,” also performed a psychedelic tribute to the late singer David Bowie at the Grammy Awards, channelling his signature androgynous look.

(Reporting by Piya Sinha-Roy, Editing by Sara Catania and Mary Milliken)

Leonardo DiCaprio finally wins an Oscar

Leonardo DiCaprio receives the Oscar for Best Actor for the movie "The Revenant" from Julianne Moore at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Leonardo DiCaprio receives the Oscar for Best Actor for the movie “The Revenant” from Julianne Moore at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Leonardo DiCaprio finally won an Oscar on Sunday, taking home the best actor statuette for his role in revenge movie “The Revenant.”

DiCaprio, 41, had been nominated four times previously for an acting Oscar over a career spanning 25 years. He was the favourite to clinch the Academy Award this year for his gruelling portrayal of a fur trapper left for dead in an icy wilderness after being mauled by a bear.

In a fight for survival, his “Revenant” character Hugh Glass treks through snow-covered forests, gets swept away in a waterfall, sleeps inside the carcass of a disemboweled horse and hungrily eats raw bison liver before making it back to his camp.

DiCaprio, a bachelor with a string of supermodel girlfriends, has matured into one of the world’s most admired and popular actors, as well as a champion of environmental causes ranging from marine reserves to the rights of indigenous people.

In his acceptance speech, DiCaprio, who received a standing ovation, said: “Let us not take this planet for granted. I do not take tonight for granted.”

DiCaprio added: “Our production needed to move to the southern tip of this planet to find snow. Climate change is real, it is happening now. It is the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together, and we need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters and the big corporations but who speak for all of humanity.”

DiCaprio had already won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild trophies for the role, which transformed the heartthrob from movies like “Titanic” and “Romeo + Juliet” into a greasy-haired 1820s fur trapper who barely speaks after the bear ripped his throat.

DiCaprio won his first Oscar nomination in 1994 for his supporting role as a mentally challenged boy in “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape.”

His romantic “Romeo + Juliet” and “Titanic” roles went unrecognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and it was another 10 years before his obsessive-compulsive Howard Hughes in “The Aviator” brought a second Oscar nomination.

Nominations for 2006’s “Blood Diamond” and 2013’s “The Wolf of Wall Street” came and went without DiCaprio taking home the most coveted trophy in show business.

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; Editing by Mary Milliken and Sandra Maler)

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‘Spotlight’ Gets Investigative Journalism Right

 “Spotlight,” the film based on the Boston Globe’s investigation of the Catholic Church, is a remarkable achievement. — Stephen Engelberg, ProPublica editor

 

STEPHEN ENGELBERG, ProPublica
February, 2016

Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, Brian d'Arcy James, Michael Keaton and John Slattery in 'Spotlight.' Publicity Photo: Kerry Hayes, © Open Road Films

Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, Brian d’Arcy James, Michael Keaton and John Slattery in ‘Spotlight.’ Publicity Photo: Kerry Hayes, © Open Road Films Next, read Tom Regan’s column, Priest sex abuse: before Boston, there was Newfoundland

There’s a moment in almost every movie when people in the audience who really know the line of work depicted on screen cry out in frustration and say: “Oh, come on!” “Absurd.” “Never happens.”

Over the decades, Hollywood screenwriters have taken liberties with every imaginable profession and craft, from doctors to lawyers to spies to police detectives. Rocky Balboa survives punches that would decapitate an ordinary boxer. The car chases in The Bourne Identity defy physics. John McClane, the hard-boiled cop in the Die Hard series, displays a supernatural ability to evade bullets.

Journalism movies have had their share of utterly improbable moments. In the 1994 film “The Paper,” the city editor of a New York City tabloid gets into a fist fight with his female boss as he tries to stop the presses. (Not a great career move.) More recently, the first season of HBO’s television series The Newsroom showed a producer landing a series of astounding scoops in the first hours after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon. The reporter’s information came from miraculously well-placed sources – a sister who worked at Halliburton and a close friend who happened to be a junior BP executive attending all the key crisis meetings.

All of this makes “Spotlight,” the film based on the Boston Globe’s investigation of the Catholic Church, a remarkable achievement. The movie, which has been nominated for six Academy Awards including best picture, vividly captures the mix of frustration, drudgery and excitement that goes into every great investigative story. Where liberties were taken, and there were a few, they are in line with the realities of the news business.

One of the most credible aspects of the movie is the cluelessness with which the reporters begin their quest. As is often the case, the Globe’s group of reporters, known as the “Spotlight” Team, have no idea of the size and scope of what they’re trying to examine. At first, they stumble around, lacking the most basic information about how the church bureaucracy worked.

The notion of pedophile priests was not new. Newspapers from Dallas to Portland had done deeply reported stories on individual cases. Boston itself had just witnessed the criminal trial of a particularly notorious priest, Father John J. Geoghan. Initially, senior editors at the Globe are not even persuaded there was a story worth chasing.

As the film briefly acknowledges, the Globe was behind the Boston Phoenix, a respected alternative weekly, in covering the subject for local readers. Kristen Lombardi, a reporter for the Phoenix, had already written a series of stories implicating Cardinal Bernard Law, the leader of Boston’s archdiocese, in allowing Geoghan to remain in daily contact with children for three decades.

“Spotlight” opens with the arrival of Marty Baron, a veteran journalist who took over at the Globe after a stint as editor of the Miami Herald. As investigative reporters know well, Florida is a reporters’ paradise, lousy with graft, corruption and colorful characters. The state’s public records laws are decisively tilted toward openness. When a Globe columnist covering the Geoghan trial wrote that “the truth may never be known,” Baron sat down with the head of the “Spotlight” team, Walter “Robby” Robinson, and asked him to take a fresh look at the issue.

The editor suggested filing a lawsuit to force release of records the Catholic Church had submitted under court seal. Such suits were unheard of in Massachusetts. Liev Schreiber, the actor who portrays Baron, captures the true life editor’s white-hot focus and intensity, so much so that long-time colleagues were taken aback by the resemblance.

The movie accurately depicts the team’s key early breakthrough. The reporters figured out that priests who had “acted out” with children were often listed in the diocese’s phone book as on leave. They obtained years of directories and pored through thousands of entries to create a database, using the then-remarkable new technology known as a computer spreadsheet. With artful editing and a stirring score, director Tom McCarthy made this excruciatingly boring work an inspiring event, which in a way it was.

Another turning point came when Sacha Pfeiffer, the Globe reporter played by Rachel McAdams, knocks on the door of a priest who off-handedly acknowledges that he has abused children. (He asserts, bizarrely, that his conduct was not improper because he was not sexually aroused.) The reporter is clearly flustered and unprepared for this admission and she rushes through the interview before a woman at the house can slam the door. The practice of “door stopping” is routine for investigative journalists; nearly all such encounters end in failure. But the few attempts that succeed deliver an adrenalin kick unlike anything in reporting.

Fascinatingly, one of the more compelling scenes about journalism in the movie was invented by Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer, the screenwriters who worked closely with the reporters and editors involved the story.

It comes late in the film, after the “Spotlight” team has figured out that scores of Boston-area priests had abused children. Eric MacLeish, a lawyer for the victims, angrily tells Robinson that he sent the Globe a list of 20 priests “and you buried it.” Soon after, the reporters come across a story that ran deep inside the Globe’s metro section when Robinson was in charge of local coverage.

The writers came across the buried story when they interviewed MacLeish as part of their research for the film. They seized on it as the perfect way to illustrate the Globe’s earlier failures to investigate an important local institution. The conversation between MacLeish and Robinson is fictional. But the sentiments portrayed in the movie are real. “It happened on my watch and I’ll go to confession on it,” the Robinson told Entertainment Weekly. “Like any journalist who’s been around this long, I’ve made my share of mistakes.”

In investigative reporting, of course, nearly all great stories are screamingly obvious in retrospect. The reporting and documents the Globe obtained through its lawsuit proved that Church leaders had knowingly shuffled around pedophile priests from parish to parish. Geoghan turned out to be a piece of a much, much larger story, one that has rippled across the United States and the world over the past 15 years. Baron has pointed out that the movie is not a stenographic record of how the investigation unfolded. But it gets the big things right, providing a compelling picture of how great reporters break big stories.

Creative Commons

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletterStephen Engelberg was the founding managing editor of ProPublica from 2008-2012, and became editor-in-chief on January 1, 2013. He worked previously as managing editor of The Oregonian in Portland, Ore., where he supervised investigative projects and news coverage. Before that, Engelberg worked for 18 years at The New York Times as an editor and reporter, founding the paper’s investigative unit and serving as a reporter in Washington, D.C., and Warsaw. Engelberg shared in two George Polk Awards for reporting: the first, in 1989, for articles on nuclear proliferation; the second, in 1994, for articles on U.S. immigration. A group of articles he co-authored in 1995 on an airplane crash was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize. Projects he supervised at the Times on Mexican corruption (published in 1997) and the rise of Al Qaeda (published beginning in January 2001) were awarded the Pulitzer Prize. During his years at The Oregonian, the paper won the Pulitzer for breaking news and was finalist for its investigative work on methamphetamines and charities intended to help the disabled. He is the co-author of “Germs: Biological Weapons and America’s Secret War” (2001).

Reader-Supported Facts and Opinions is employee-owned and ad-free. We survive on an honour system. Thanks for your interest and support. Details.

Next, read Tom Regan’s column, Priest sex abuse: before Boston, there was Newfoundland

It was a bombshell: a local paper printed an exposé on sexual abuse by Catholic religious figures. No, I’m not talking about the Boston Globe, and its 2002 series on sexual abuse that won a Pulitzer Prize and is also the subject of the much praised film released November 6, “Spotlight.” That happened almost a decade after the story I’m referring to.

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Facts and Opinions is a boutique journal of reporting and analysis in words and images, without borders. Independent, non-partisan and employee-owned, F&O is funded by our readers. It is ad-free and spam-free, and does not solicit donations from partisan organizations. To continue we require a minimum payment of .27 for one story, or a sustaining donation. Details here; donate below. Thanks for your interest and support.

F&O’s CONTENTS page is updated each Saturday. Sign up for emailed announcements of new work on our free FRONTLINES blog; find evidence-based reporting in Reports; commentary, analysis and creative non-fiction in OPINION-FEATURES; and image galleries in PHOTO-ESSAYS. If you value journalism please support F&O, and tell others about us.

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Priest sex abuse: before Boston, there was Newfoundland

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TOM REGAN: SUMMONING ORENDA
November, 2015

It was a bombshell.

A well-known local paper printing a front-page exposé on sexual abuse by Catholic religious figures in an overwhelmingly Catholic region of the country. Not only did the story expose malfeasance on the part of the Roman Catholic Church, but also on the part of many local officials who had not only known about the abuse but had helped covered it up.

No, I’m not talking about the Boston Globe, and its 2002 series on sexual abuse that won a Pulitzer Prize and is also the subject of the much-praised film released November 6, “Spotlight.” That happened almost a decade after the story I’m referring to.

The newspaper I’m talking about is the St. John’s Sunday Express in St. John’s, Newfoundland. And the exposé concerned a group known as the Christian Brothers who ran an orphanage in the province that was so riddled with sexual abuse, as we came to know, that once exposed it staggered the entire province, then the entire country.

Before I tell you the rest of the story, I have two points to make.

Hollywood loves to pump up the achievements of any American, so that it seems like no one else in the rest of the world could have possibly been involved in any similar endeavour. Canadians are already familiar with this strategy, watching the predominantly Canadian role in the rescue of six Iranian hostages from Tehran in 1980 reduced to a bit part supporting the Ben Affleck–hero who pulled the whole thing off.

The second point is more of a personal one. While I am an atheist now, I was raised as a Catholic, and I am from Newfoundland. While I did not spend many years there, I have many relatives from my father’s side of the family still living there. One of my lasting memories from a visit in the early 80’s is of four priests sitting around my Aunt Marge’s dinner table while she waited on them hand and foot. And she felt honoured to do so, so profound was the admiration for the Catholic Church in Newfoundland.

The Irish Christian Brothers weren’t clergy, but a lay order that took vows of celibacy and wore religious habits. They had established the Mount Cashel Orphanage in 1876 and were much respected on the island. But allegations of abuse about the Brothers started to surface in the mid-70s. An investigation by the province’s social service department, that included suggestions that abuse was taking place, was forwarded to the orphanage’s superintendent, and then forgotten about. Further investigations by the police in the following decade were silenced by superiors. The main newspaper in Newfoundland, the Evening Telegram, came close to printing a story in 1976, but it was quashed by its publisher.

Over the following decade, the sexual abuse was almost revealed several times, but was always either pushed under the rug or ignored. But then allegations of abuse against Catholic priests nationally were starting to attract attention. On the evening of February 13, 1989, so the story goes according to an article on the Heritage Newfoundland website, a caller to local radio station VOCM’s popular Open Line program alleged the authorities had covered up the Mount Cashel abuse.

Then on March 19th the Sunday Express printed the story of Shane Earl, a former Mount Cashel resident. And, as they say, all hell broke loose. In September of 1989, an inquiry led by retired Ontario Supreme Court Judge Samuel Hughes was opened.

As Sunday Express editor Michael Harris later wrote in his book on Mount Cashel, “Unholy Orders”: “By the time the Hughes Inquiry had finished its somber deliberations on Mount Cashel, it had laid bare a stunning, collective failure of the judicial, police, religious, media and social service establishments to protect the interests of hopelessly vulnerable and cruelly abused children.”

The Mount Cashel debacle turned out to be the tip of the iceberg for the Catholic Church in Canada. Other Christian Brother institutions across the country, particularly in Saskatchewan and Ontario, faced allegations that ultimately forced the order’s leaders in Rome to transfer its assets out of Canada because it was being forced to pay so many victims. Meanwhile new allegations of abuse against native Canadians by Catholic clergy also began to surface. This time the allegations weren’t against the Catholic Church alone, but also included many mainline Protestant churches.

But, the way the world works, nothing really happens until it happens in the United States.

Allegations of sexual abuse by Catholic clergy and lay orders can now be found in countries around the globe. Benedict 16th, when he was still Cardinal Ratzinger, played a key role in helping to keep the abuse scandal as quiet as possible.

A final word about the Sunday Express. It was a kick-ass paper doomed to failure because it was kick-ass. It exposed many scandals on the part of the Newfoundland government, and the powers-that-be in the province did not take kindly to being held to task, withdrew advertising and the paper was forced to close in 1990.

Because the truth is that government is not interested in freedom of the press. Government is interested in compliant media, which is most of what Canada now has, particularly in print media.

Michael Harris has not stopped ruffling feathers. He continues to be one of Canada’s best journalists. You can read his most recent works at the Canadian online website iPolitics.ca, where he continues to hold politicians feet to the fire.

As for the Catholic Church, be it in Newfoundland, or Boston, or Ireland, or Australia, or Norway or Poland, the revelations of abuse and their aftershocks continue to roil that institution. One hopes that Pope Francis, who seems to offer so much inspiration to so many people on so many fronts, can deal with the issue in a decisive way.

But this is the Catholic Church. Don’t keep your fingers crossed.

Copyright Tom Regan 2015

Contact Tom Regan:  motnager@gmail.com

Links

Catholic Church sexual abuse cases: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church_sexual_abuse_cases

Mount Cashel Orphanage Abuse Scandal: http://www.heritage.nf.ca/articles/politics/wells-government-mt-cashel.php

Unholy Orders: tragedy at Mount Cashel: https://books.google.com/books/about/Unholy_orders.html?id=HRYEAQAAIAAJ

Michael Harris columns at iPolitics: http://ipolitics.ca/author/mharris/

Related stories on Facts and Opinions:

The cast of the film "Spotlight" react after they won the Oscar for Best Picture at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016.    REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

The cast of the film “Spotlight” react after they won the Oscar for Best Picture at the 88th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California February 28, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

‘Spotlight’ wins top Oscar amid race-related critiques.By Jill Serjeant, Reuters

Catholic Church abuse movie “Spotlight” was named best picture, the top award at Sunday’s Oscar ceremony, after an evening peppered with pointed punchlines from host Chris Rock about the #OscarsSoWhite controversy that has dominated the industry.

‘Spotlight’ Gets Investigative Journalism Right. By Stephen Engelberg, ProPublica

“Spotlight,” the film based on the Boston Globe’s investigation of the Catholic Church, is a remarkable achievement. The movie, which has been nominated for six Academy Awards including best picture, vividly captures the mix of frustration, drudgery and excitement that goes into every great investigative story.
Related: The 88th Oscars: Focus on Hollywood, F&O blog, collation of Oscars stories

 

Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, Brian d'Arcy James, Michael Keaton and John Slattery in 'Spotlight.' Publicity Photo: Kerry Hayes, © Open Road Films

Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, Brian d’Arcy James, Michael Keaton and John Slattery in ‘Spotlight.’ Publicity Photo: Kerry Hayes, © Open Road Films

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Tom Regan Tom Regan has worked for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and with the National Film Board in Canada, and in the United States for the Christian Science Monitor, Boston Globe, and National Public Radio. A former executive director of the Online News Association, he was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 1991-92.

 

 

 

 

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Facts and Opinions is a boutique journal of reporting and analysis in words and images, without borders. Independent, non-partisan and employee-owned, F&O is funded only by you, our readers. We are ad-free and spam-free, and do not solicit donations from partisan organizations. To continue we need a minimum payment of .27 for one story, or a sustaining donation. Visit our Subscribe page for details, or donate below. With enough supporters each paying a small amount, we will continue, and increase our original works like this.

F&O’s CONTENTS page is updated each Saturday. Sign up for emailed announcements of new work on our free FRONTLINES blog; find evidence-based reporting in Reports; commentary, analysis and creative non-fiction in OPINION-FEATURES; and image galleries in PHOTO-ESSAYS. If you value journalism please support F&O, and tell others about us.

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