Graffiti Interpretations of the Berlin Wall

The Berlin Wall was one of the greatest Cold War symbols. When it came down in 1989 it marked not only the reunification of Germany, but a wider collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. A quarter century later — years in which Germany grew to become an economic leader in the region, and a world leader in providing clean energy — the wall remains a potent symbol. Analysts, historians and academics from every discipline have myriad interpretations of its symbolism, but the most vivid are surely by Germany’s graffiti artists. Here, they have the last word.

— Gavin Kennedy

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 

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Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

Photo by Gavin Kennedy, Copyright 2011

 Copyright Gavin Kennedy, 2014

Gavin Kennedy is a photographer and documentary filmmaker. 

 

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