Wandering through the icebergs

I just posted my photo essay Welcome to Iceberg Alley  in the GEO section.  A collection of photos and a look at how the people of Newfoundland live, study,  work, and make the most of these floating ice giants that come from

Welcome to Iceberg Alley

In most places, it’s flowers that signal the coming of spring. Newfoundland and Labrador have the flowers – but also icebergs. It’s not uncommon to wander the coastal trails and fishing villages on a warm sunny spring day, with a backdrop of

Talk, not guns, between Egypt and Ethiopia – for now

There is an unintended consequence of the army’s coup in Egypt, writes international affairs analyst Jonathan Manthorpe in today’s column. It has averted the threatened war between Egypt and  Ethiopia, over control of the waters of the Nile River on which Egypt

Seamus Heaney’s living past

In 1995 the Irish poet Seamus Heaney was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, “for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past.” In his death today he becomes a part of our “living past.”

Seamus Heaney: R.I.P.

DEBORAH JONES: FREE RANGEPublished August 30, 2013   The death of Irish poet Seamus Heaney is a reminder of the luminous souls amongst us, whose work will reverberate long after today’s transient thugs and loud charlatans have passed through the news cycle.

Fracking: at what cost, for what benefits?

The technology of “fracking” has transformed North America’s fuel forecast and global energy politics in one brief generation. But the story of fracking  is really a story about risk – and how we, as individuals and communities, face and trade off unavoidable contingencies, writes

Humans naturally nasty? Research suggests not

Research shows that human “morality” is grounded in science. Whether our societies can transcend tribal affiliations is another matter. By Deborah Jones  February 2012 Vancouver, Canada (AFP) —  Biological research increasingly debunks the view of humanity as competitive, aggressive and brutish, says biologist and

Manthorpe explains Syria’s Gordian knot

An American-led attack on military assets of the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad in retaliation for a nerve gas attack on civilians last week now appears inevitable, writes Jonathan Manthorpe in today’s column. Only the timing is in doubt.   The column,

Cutting Syria’s Gordian knot no simple feat

JONATHAN MANTHORPE Published: August 28, 2013  An American-led attack on military assets of the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad, in retaliation for a nerve gas attack on civilians last week, now appears inevitable. Only the timing is in doubt. But it is

1 2 3